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657224 Posts in 9253 Topics by 3396 Members Latest Member: - vlozan86 Most online today: 239 - most online ever: 494 (Jul 01, 2007, 02:59:53 PM)
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Author Topic: $9.99 ebook vs $11.66 real book  (Read 5566 times)
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peacocks
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« Reply #50 on: Feb 21, 2012, 10:55:58 PM »

ha, I'm definitely not there yet but I brought a real book on my trip this weekend instead of my kindle and was bummed when I finished it and couldn't just start reading another one right away.
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coldforge
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« Reply #51 on: Feb 22, 2012, 10:45:21 AM »

I have not been able to integrate my Nook into my habits at all. When I conceive of some book I'd like to find and read, it is 90% of the time not available on the barnes and noble online store and 90% of the time available in either The Strand or the actual B&N that are five minute walks from my work. Short of those pirated ebooks I have that are in the right format, I can't imagine ever making the jump to using the Nook full time. It's still mostly a curiosity.
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elpollodiablo
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Posts: 32624


« Reply #52 on: Feb 22, 2012, 10:54:27 AM »

I imagine the Amazon selection is better though, yeah?

Also this is an essential tool if you download/read many ebooks: http://calibre-ebook.com/
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jebreject
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« Reply #53 on: Feb 23, 2012, 07:32:11 PM »

Lately all the books I've wanted to buy have been cheaper in their physical version than e-book. The fuck.
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Adro
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Posts: 41


« Reply #54 on: Feb 23, 2012, 07:47:46 PM »

real, heavy, smelly books for life.

  i've wanted an e-reader for a little while, but only for magazine  and news subscriptions
cause the yearly subscriptions are hella cheap compared to getting magazines in the mail and having stacks
of them lying around. and for reading blogs i like, and the ease of the free wi fi some feature.

though it makes me really sad that printed magazines and newspapers are going out of business.
 

 
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jm
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Posts: 4803


« Reply #55 on: Feb 23, 2012, 07:51:32 PM »

Yeah, that's what I've found, as a person with only the Kindle app (as opposed to a hardware e-reader).  It helps that there are used bookstores and places like The Strand around where I can get sometimes-seemingly-untouched physical copies for less than half of the ebook version.

xpost

...but only for magazine  and news subscriptions
cause the yearly subscriptions are hella cheap compared to getting magazines in the mail and having stacks
of them lying around.

Offhand, I can't really think of any magazine I'd subscribe to, but I know that when I have them (e.g., what I can only assume was a promotional subscription to Rolling Stone that started showing up at my house with my name on it) I tend to keep them around, telling myself I'll read this or that article one day, and then just having to throw them out in great heaps.
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mixed cats
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« Reply #56 on: Feb 24, 2012, 07:30:00 PM »

Lately all the books I've wanted to buy have been cheaper in their physical version than e-book. The fuck.
I was looking at something and there's a paperback for $6 and the ebook is still $10. Annoying.

Reading giant hardbacks has become really hard for me because I can't  rest them on my abdomen comfortably anymore. I don't really read too many books on the iPad, just free or really cheap ones, and things I want to read immediately in the middle of the night.
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Chet
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« Reply #57 on: Mar 11, 2012, 05:37:47 PM »

i dunno if it's the same in the US, but here ebooks are subject to VAT whereas physical books are not.
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #58 on: Mar 11, 2012, 05:51:09 PM »

So, how about that ebook price fixing? http://money.cnn.com/2012/03/08/technology/apple-ebook-price/?source=cnn_bin

Heard a dude on NPR the other day very sensibly saying that while there are relatively few people who believe even $10 is a good price for a digital file, the industry could expand their customer base several times over by cutting that price to $4 or $5. Of course the industry basically doesn't think they'll be able to survive on $10 a copy. Which, if you can't figure out how to continue to reap a profit from a product you acquire for the same amount as before but which does not now require printing, warehousing, shipping, etc., fuck your industry and the dummies clinging to it. I mean seriously can anyone make a convincing case for the continued existence of even one of these old, large publishing houses? I'd be interested to hear it.
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davy
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« Reply #59 on: Mar 11, 2012, 06:43:24 PM »

The curatorial aspect, for one.
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #60 on: Mar 11, 2012, 06:50:42 PM »

But they publish largely crap
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dieblucasdie
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« Reply #61 on: Mar 11, 2012, 08:33:01 PM »

The curatorial aspect, for one.

I think the critical apparatus (whether traditional or twittery-bloggy) and good old-fashioned word-of-mouth are doing/will do a better job of this anyhow.
« Last Edit: Mar 11, 2012, 08:34:54 PM by dieblucasdie » Logged

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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #62 on: Mar 11, 2012, 08:51:27 PM »

The best argument I've heard thus far is "Hey do you really want a large percentage of your reading material coming through or from one company?" to which I'd reply, no, of course not, but I think there are probably possibilities beyond just moldering, irrelevant NYC-based publishing houses setting the reading agenda for the country or absolute Amazon hegemony now and forever.
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davy
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« Reply #63 on: Mar 12, 2012, 08:39:39 AM »

The curatorial aspect, for one.

I think the critical apparatus (whether traditional or twittery-bloggy) and good old-fashioned word-of-mouth are doing/will do a better job of this anyhow.

Only for a certain in-the-know segment of the population. People who follow publishing trends + friends and acquaintances of those people. 80-90% of readers across the country trust these large houses to publish and promote books they'll enjoy reading.

I mean, I'm not some ardent supporter of huge publishing houses -- they've made life very difficult for librarians lately -- but I think it's silly to claim they're suddenly irrelevant.
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #64 on: Mar 12, 2012, 08:43:05 AM »

It wasn't sudden.
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #65 on: Mar 12, 2012, 08:53:55 AM »

The curatorial aspect, for one.

I think the critical apparatus (whether traditional or twittery-bloggy) and good old-fashioned word-of-mouth are doing/will do a better job of this anyhow.

Only for a certain in-the-know segment of the population. People who follow publishing trends + friends and acquaintances of those people. 80-90% of readers across the country trust these large houses to publish and promote books they'll enjoy reading.

Also, is there anyone out there who wants this arrangement to persist who isn't currently part of it?
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dieblucasdie
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« Reply #66 on: Mar 12, 2012, 09:19:39 AM »

Remember Stieg Larrsson's come-up? The big publishing money got involved after those books were already a hit, and that's been the book industry's biggest non-young-adult thing since, what? Da Vinci Code, probably? I think you're underestimating that 80-90%, davy. You don't need to be a haxxor to see your friends post about a book they liked on FB, or to, you know, look at ratings on Amazon or iTunes or wherever.
« Last Edit: Mar 12, 2012, 09:29:21 AM by dieblucasdie » Logged

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coldforge
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« Reply #67 on: Mar 12, 2012, 09:53:41 AM »

Clay Shirky can be insufferable sometimes, but he has a good rule of thumb when it comes to these things: Institutions will try to preserve the problems to which they are the solution.
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davy
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« Reply #68 on: Mar 12, 2012, 10:46:57 AM »

Remember Stieg Larrsson's come-up? The big publishing money got involved after those books were already a hit, and that's been the book industry's biggest non-young-adult thing since, what? Da Vinci Code, probably? I think you're underestimating that 80-90%, davy. You don't need to be a haxxor to see your friends post about a book they liked on FB, or to, you know, look at ratings on Amazon or iTunes or wherever.

I don't personally know anyone who read those Stieg Larsson books before the big publishing money got involved, but that series is probably not the best example. It was published in Sweden three years before it was even translated into English.

Also, is there anyone out there who wants this arrangement to persist who isn't currently part of it?

I think the people who rely on this arrangement the most aren't necessarily aware of it...which of course also makes them easy targets.
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #69 on: Mar 12, 2012, 10:54:34 AM »

Targets for whom?
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davy
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« Reply #70 on: Mar 12, 2012, 11:06:24 AM »

Marketing depts.
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #71 on: Mar 12, 2012, 11:15:34 AM »

So... are you saying there's a need for a cartel of big publishing houses run by professional tastemakers who come largely out of the same backgrounds and schools because that 80-90% of people aren't going to be able to effectively curate their own reading experiences? Or am I missing your point?
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davy
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« Reply #72 on: Mar 12, 2012, 01:03:17 PM »

I'm just saying that if you threw away an industry that has centuries of experience bringing human thought to the printed page, an industry that demands the best work of the brightest minds in publishing, there's going to be some downside to that.

And if the 80/90 figure doesn't sit well with you, feel free to disregard it...but I believe a great majority of recreational readers -- in this country, at least -- benefit greatly from the promotional machinery of the publishing industry. Of the dozen or so books I've read this year, at least 8 of them were brought to my attention as a result of promotions or marketing no independent publisher would've been able to afford.

I'm not saying that makes up for the downsides, I'm just pointing out a benefit.
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #73 on: Mar 12, 2012, 01:08:14 PM »

You and I seem to have profoundly divergent notions of what the publishing industry was/is/does/expects of itself.
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dieblucasdie
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« Reply #74 on: Mar 12, 2012, 01:37:21 PM »

Remember Stieg Larrsson's come-up? The big publishing money got involved after those books were already a hit, and that's been the book industry's biggest non-young-adult thing since, what? Da Vinci Code, probably? I think you're underestimating that 80-90%, davy. You don't need to be a haxxor to see your friends post about a book they liked on FB, or to, you know, look at ratings on Amazon or iTunes or wherever.

I don't personally know anyone who read those Stieg Larsson books before the big publishing money got involved, but that series is probably not the best example. It was published in Sweden three years before it was even translated into English.


The big UK and US publishing houses passed on Girl with a Dragon Tattoo, even though it was a hit in Sweden, in large part because Larrson was dead, and couldn't participate in the kind of publicity campaigns they use to launch first-time writers.  I was an independent UK publisher who couldn't afford that stuff who printed the first English translation.

Wooo gatekeepers, passing on the largest adult fiction hit in a decade
« Last Edit: Mar 12, 2012, 01:39:32 PM by dieblucasdie » Logged

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