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657250 Posts in 9253 Topics by 3396 Members Latest Member: - vlozan86 Most online today: 90 - most online ever: 494 (Jul 01, 2007, 02:59:53 PM)
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Author Topic: Current reading material?  (Read 224299 times)
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william
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Posts: 493


« Reply #25 on: Aug 03, 2004, 06:11:37 PM »

I haven't read any of his others, but If on a winter's night is just amazing. Calvino churns out so many stories that you want to hear, and then cuts you off each time. I also gotta agree with unleavenedprofundityloaf, dale peck is great (though he seems like a bit of a jerk).Has anyone read any Murakami?
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iagoAdmirer
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Posts: 15


« Reply #26 on: Aug 03, 2004, 06:21:05 PM »

Still mulling through The Life Of Pi, but Infinite Jest, Slaughterhouse-Five and Biblical Games are up next. Cult classics abound! I can't wait to get into Wallace, i haven't read any of his stuff yet. I'm gonna try and sit in on some of his classes next semester and soak in the brilliance.
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iagoAdmirer
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Posts: 15


« Reply #27 on: Aug 03, 2004, 06:21:46 PM »

And yes, Murakami is the bestest sheep this little kid has found yet.
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-"You tread the ridge between truth and insult with the skill of a mountain goat."-
william
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Posts: 493


« Reply #28 on: Aug 03, 2004, 06:23:36 PM »

Ah, slaughterhouse five *sighs the contented sigh of one now ready to die* Ahhhhhh.
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william
Registered user

Posts: 493


« Reply #29 on: Aug 03, 2004, 06:24:40 PM »

That last 'Ahhhh' was intended to signify a more drawn out contented sigh, rather than death. But either's good.
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No bottle has he anymore.
Lalitree
Administrator
Registered user

Posts: 1655


« Reply #30 on: Aug 03, 2004, 06:44:19 PM »

Quote from: "iagoAdmirer"
I can't wait to get into Wallace, i haven't read any of his stuff yet. I'm gonna try and sit in on some of his classes next semester and soak in the brilliance.


You will never know how jealous I am of you!  Mad
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SPACERACE
Registered user

Posts: 12155


« Reply #31 on: Aug 03, 2004, 06:55:42 PM »

I'm supposed to be in the middle of Carl Hiaasen's "Skinny Dip", but I recently left it at a friend's house, and have yet to to retrieve it.

Before that, it was "Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim", and then before that, Murakami's "South of the Border, West of the Sun", which was the first book to make me cry since I was about seven years old.

I'm so emo.  Crying or Very sad
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Supplier of highest-quality synthetic duck butter
Nickosaurus
Registered user

Posts: 1795


« Reply #32 on: Aug 03, 2004, 07:15:48 PM »

Quote from: "Kath"

Goddamn. I brought that to Italy with me, and a powerpar exploded in my bag, leaving it unreadable. I had to throw it out. I made my friend read them aloud to me, but we didn't get to finish. Sad


I will cry for your poor soul. Thank god for libraries, I suppose.
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sedita
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Posts: 261


« Reply #33 on: Aug 03, 2004, 07:24:08 PM »

murakami!

oh yes.
oh yes.
oh yes.

yes.

j.
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swilkes
Registered user

Posts: 1032


« Reply #34 on: Aug 03, 2004, 07:31:38 PM »

Quote

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I'm on a big Thomas Pynchon kick this summer, having read "The Crying of Lot 49" and "V.," and now starting on "Gravity's Rainbow," which will take me forever.


I'm halfway thru my second reading of GR, this time with the aid of
an online annotation. I'm starting to think that this is *the* great novel of the mid-20th century. It really rips into the major traumas of the time--the real end of 19th c. colonialism; the horrific advancement of weapons technology and the related development of the modern corporation; Freudianism, Marxism, Jungianism, etc.--all viewed thru a lens of 1960s psychedelia.  And so much more!  I expect GR will soon be considered its generation's Ulysses, if it hasn't already.

The Crying of Lot 49 was fun, but not nearly as mind-blowing as GR.[/url]
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ex-lion tamer
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Posts: 301


« Reply #35 on: Aug 03, 2004, 08:22:09 PM »

I have been reading "Across the Nightingale Floor" and "Grass for his Pillow" by Lian Hearn. They are some of the best written fantasy books that I have read in a long time, although I am admittedly out of the Fantasy loop-I used to read it like crazy when I was younger but I got old and tricked myslef into thinking I should read more "serious" stuff.  Truly riveting and fun reading (especially "Grass for his Pillow).
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hek-tor the destroy-or
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Posts: 16


« Reply #36 on: Aug 03, 2004, 09:19:39 PM »

i'm going to just admit that i'm a philistine and that the only things i've been reading lately are philip k. dick's dr. bloodmoney and a bunch of comic books: eightball #23 by daniel clowes (best single issue of a comic to be published this year), rabbithead by jessica dart, planetary by warren ellis and john cassaday, and i'll be thrice goddamned if that new chris ware-edited issue of mcsweeney's isn't something.
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iagoAdmirer
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Posts: 15


« Reply #37 on: Aug 03, 2004, 09:22:54 PM »

I did Not just create a list of 30 books to read! For shame.
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-"You tread the ridge between truth and insult with the skill of a mountain goat."-
Roque
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Posts: 166


« Reply #38 on: Aug 03, 2004, 10:30:54 PM »

Excellent taste, you guys. I am the arbiter of taste, I should clarify. No, but seriously, good books, mostly. Why the DFW infatuation though??? His essays are where he's gold. His books, iron pyrite. Mounds of it. And he knows far less about math than he thinks he does (q.v. Jim Holt's dressing-down in the New Yorker).

While I clearly cannot use metaphors, allow me to point you guys to James Wood, who knows metaphors. He's got a piece on DFW that I recommend you LEXIS-NEXIS. (If you can't LEXIS-NEXIS, I'll up and e-mail it to you, if you want.) Wood is the brilliant purple antidote to Dale Peck. God bless Stan Crouch for bitch-slapping him. (Funny that Wood was actually the one who tapped Peck for  his position at The New Republic.)

/////
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And so it was that Pooh discovered that his friend Tigger was merely the representative of a reactionary class, and needed to be overthrown.
polkadotchickens
Registered user

Posts: 152


« Reply #39 on: Aug 03, 2004, 11:24:08 PM »

currently reading stardust, just finished neverwhere, both neil gaiman.  and hurrah for one hundred years of solitude, just lent it out.  haha, that sounds familiar...

Quote from: "wordsofglass"
Quote from: "trailofmusic"
I finished Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude recently.  What a wild ride that was!

I just started that! It's pretty confusing with all the Jose's. I was loaned it by the girl who got me started on tMG actually.

I just finished Survivor by Chuck. He's pretty awesome. Before that I read Stardust by Neil Gaiman, who is far and above in the art of spellcasting. I finished that book within a span of 36 hours and finished Neverwhere earlier this year over the course of 3 days.


hmm, indeed.  yay for bookswapping.  and because no one's said it yet and it should be said, dune!  DUNE!  frank herbert is incredible.  also, any short stories by fitzgerald, and faulkner is awesome, too, if you have the patience (though it does take a good bit).
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polishq
Registered user

Posts: 33


« Reply #40 on: Aug 04, 2004, 12:16:31 AM »

Quote from: "swilkes"
Quote

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I'm on a big Thomas Pynchon kick this summer, having read "The Crying of Lot 49" and "V.," and now starting on "Gravity's Rainbow," which will take me forever.


I'm halfway thru my second reading of GR, this time with the aid of
an online annotation. I'm starting to think that this is *the* great novel of the mid-20th century. It really rips into the major traumas of the time--the real end of 19th c. colonialism; the horrific advancement of weapons technology and the related development of the modern corporation; Freudianism, Marxism, Jungianism, etc.--all viewed thru a lens of 1960s psychedelia.  And so much more!  I expect GR will soon be considered its generation's Ulysses, if it hasn't already.

The Crying of Lot 49 was fun, but not nearly as mind-blowing as GR.[/url]


That's good to hear! I tried to read both V. and GR last year but didn't get far in either (possibly because I was at school and that kills my pleasure reading). Starting with Lot 49 this summer made things a lot easier. It was a book that I could get into, and it got me used to his style. V. was a little less coherent to me, but still enjoyable. I like how certain institutions and characters carry over between books.

I have a feeling that once I actually set myself to it and finish GR, it will be my favorite book, and Pynchon my favorite author. It certainly SEEMS like *the* book of the 20th century. Just seeing its girth on the bookshelf was enough to make me buy it.

Of course, until I finish it, Haruki Murakami's Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World will continue to hold my #1 spot.
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wordsofglass
Registered user

Posts: 48


« Reply #41 on: Aug 04, 2004, 12:25:24 AM »

Huh, sounds familiar indeed.

Quote from: "polkadotchickens"
currently reading stardust, just finished neverwhere, both neil gaiman.  and hurrah for one hundred years of solitude, just lent it out.  haha, that sounds familiar...

Quote from: "wordsofglass"
Quote from: "trailofmusic"
I finished Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude recently.  What a wild ride that was!

I just started that! It's pretty confusing with all the Jose's. I was loaned it by the girl who got me started on tMG actually.

I just finished Survivor by Chuck. He's pretty awesome. Before that I read Stardust by Neil Gaiman, who is far and above in the art of spellcasting. I finished that book within a span of 36 hours and finished Neverwhere earlier this year over the course of 3 days.


hmm, indeed.  yay for bookswapping.  and because no one's said it yet and it should be said, dune!  DUNE!  frank herbert is incredible.  also, any short stories by fitzgerald, and faulkner is awesome, too, if you have the patience (though it does take a good bit).


I second the motion on Dune. I reread the first book at the beginning of the summer...His son...is fucking Frank's corpse though. Those books suck ass, still I'm inexplicably compelled to read them. *sigh*

Oh, Hermann Hesse, don't think anybody's mentioned him....I like him at least. Favorite by him is Narcissus and Goldmund reminded me very much of a friend I'd grown apart from when I'd read it and I gave it to him as a part of his wedding gift, not knowing much about wedding-gift-giving.

Quote from: "giant_robot7"
I've been on a magical realism kick for the last year or so, but always end up preferring Borges or Julio Cortazar to Marquez.


I lost the book of Borges shorts I had, but the stories I read by him (of the ones i remember following) were really good. That was a while ago though, maybe I'll get back to him after reading Marquez.
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Kath
Registered user

Posts: 95


« Reply #42 on: Aug 04, 2004, 12:27:13 AM »

re Slaughterhouse Five: Call me crazy, but this isn't my favorite Vonnegut book. I love it, it's probably number three or four, but Breakfast of Champions and Bluebeard are definitely much better.
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Stiletto Elephant
Registered user

Posts: 62


« Reply #43 on: Aug 04, 2004, 12:29:55 AM »

I was at the book store with my mom today, picking up a comic book. The comic book soon seemed pretty irrelevant because she pointed out China Mieville's new novel.

I did not know he had written a new one.

The sound that followed this revelation was somewhere between a squeak, a death rattle, and an erotic groan. It was in my hands in seconds. The clerk looked at me with what I can only assume was a mixture of bemusement and genuine pity.

It's called the Iron Council. It's another one set in the masterpiece of a city that is New Crobuzon. Unfortunately that's all I know right now, because every time I try to open it up and start reading, my own excitement stops me.

This is not hyperbole. It would probably help me look a little more dignified if it was.
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mike
polkadotchickens
Registered user

Posts: 152


« Reply #44 on: Aug 04, 2004, 12:39:47 AM »

oh!  i forgot earlier!  william carlos williams.  there's been a distinct lack of poetry mentioned, and wc williams' stuff is amazing.  in particular, "portrait of a lady," "danse russe," and all of paterson.  who shall say i am not the happy genius of my household?
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Maaik
Registered user

Posts: 15119


« Reply #45 on: Aug 04, 2004, 12:44:43 AM »

Pitching this in cos I haven't seen anyone mention it, but House Of Leaves by Mark Danielewski was a really harrowing read for me a few summers ago.  If you appreciate the literary hurdles that DFW, Pynchon, Eco, Delillo (and to a lesser extent, Palahniuk) put you through, you'll probably like this book.

Thing was, I unwittingly discovered Radiohead's Amnesiac to be the perfect soundtrack.  They almost seem to cross-reference each other re: the Labrinth/Minotaur and both are soaked in fin de siecle paranoia and good old fear of the dark.

I tore through the 700+ pages in about six days.

I can't summarize the book in any succinct manner, so if you're interested, here's a review:
http://www.themodernword.com/review_house_of_leaves.html

But right now, I'm reading a critical analysis of Richard Brautigan by Terence Malley that I scrounged out of a used bookstore.  It's good light reading until I can get back into the fifteen other books I've already started.
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Andrew_TSKS
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Posts: 39426


« Reply #46 on: Aug 04, 2004, 01:10:35 AM »

jeb--yeah, joe lansdale wrote bubba ho-tep, which i haven't seen so i can't comment on it. but i know his books are great. you should start with "the bottoms", if you're inclined to get into his writing. also, i agree that elmore leonard is fucking amazing, but i think i like hiaasen slightly better. i know, i know... sacrilege.

also, house of leaves is an excellent, excellent book. poe's album "haunted" is sort of an actual tie-in with the book--the author is her brother. but ummmm... poe's music isn't very good. so yeah, "amnesiac" probably is a better soundtrack.
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I just want to be myself and I want you to love me for who I am.
haav
Registered user

Posts: 84


« Reply #47 on: Aug 04, 2004, 01:19:07 AM »

reading Henry James stories, Eight Tales From the Major Phase.

and i can't think of a simile good enough to do justice to how delicate and precise and beautiful these stories are...just, like, fuckin' A, man!!


also about to start reading this goofy thing called "how soccer explains the world", which argues how the political and social ideologies of individual countries are reflected and expressed through international/club soccer.
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justinh
Registered user

Posts: 3083


« Reply #48 on: Aug 04, 2004, 01:21:56 AM »

murakami is totally brilliant and is far and away my favorite contemporary author.  i was only reading murakami books for a while this spring.  sputnik sweetheart, the wind up bird chronicles, and norwegian wood where all amazing, interesting, and had me up all night racing to the end.  dance dance dance and the elephant vanishes were comparitively not so good.  i think i need to go get south of the border, west of the sun next.
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elpollodiablo
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Posts: 32624


« Reply #49 on: Aug 04, 2004, 01:24:20 AM »

As far as House Of Leaves goes: Haters be damned, that's one of the most amazing pieces of literature I've ever applied myself to. Incredible, from start to finish. I can't imagine what that man must be like.
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think 'on the road.'
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